If you go to the gym often, you probably come across supplements before a workout. Often in powdered form, these drinks should be consumed immediately before exercise to increase energy, which can lead to more intense and effective sweating. Some everyday athletes swear by them as a mandatory workout.”But are they really necessary for the average coach? And what do sports nutrition experts think about you? That’s what they had to say:


WHAT IS DONE IN THE APPS BEFORE TRAINING?

Before we can assess whether supplements are necessary before training, we need to know what they contain. That’s what is most often included in these supplements:

CARBOHYDRATES

Some pre-workout supplements contain carbohydrates, which can be useful before any workout. “Even 15-25 grams can help with endurance,” says Heidi Skolnik, a certified nutritionist and sports nutrition specialist at the Women’s Sports Medicine Center of the Hospital for Special Surgery. “Even in a spin class, it can help you push harder,” she adds. Carbohydrates are especially easy to get from food sources, she emphasizes.

Caffeine

Most pre-workout supplements contain caffeine. In fact, it is the main active ingredient. “Caffeine is a well-known ergogenic agent, which means that it can increase performance,” says Amy Goodson, a nutritionist specializing in sports nutrition. “Most studies show that it is most effective for workouts lasting from 0 to 20 minutes or more than an hour, but many believe that they usually benefit from it. Because it stimulates the central nervous system, it can help provide energy for a workout.””

Creatine

“Many pre-workout medications contain creatine to boost strength during workouts,” says Goodson. “It’s probably more useful with strength training than with cardio.”

BETA-ALANINE

“With regular intake, beta-alanine can help boost lactic acid levels in your muscles, which allows you to work longer,” says Goodson. “However, beta-alanine usually needs to be taken for a month to benefit from it. One dose usually doesn’t do much.”

ARGININE

“Arginine is a precursor to nitric oxide, a vasodilator,” says Goodson. “This means that it helps to dilate the veins and theoretically provides more oxygen and nutrients to the working muscles.”This means you can work harder and longer and get better results from your workouts.

THE BENEFITS OF PRE-WORKOUT SUPPLEMENTS
IT CAN HELP TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE

Although it’s not guaranteed, taking supplements before a workout can help you work harder and for longer. He is a very big professional.”The potential benefits are increased productivity, improved strength, speed, endurance and concentration,” says Skolnik. “It also reduces perceived effort, so you can work more thoroughly with less perceived effort.”In other words, your workout can get easier.

IT CAN BE YOUR MENTAL, GAME HELP

“Caffeine can improve mental performance and alertness by affecting the central nervous system,” says Julie Stefanski, a certified sports nutritionist and representative of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. In addition to feeling that your workout is easier than it actually is, you can also be more focused on the task at hand.

DISADVANTAGE
HOW YOUR BODY REACTS BASED ON YOUR GENES

A new study has shown that not everyone reacts equally to caffeine in an active environment. “The study revealed a significant gene-caffeine interaction, which means that the effect of caffeine on performance depends on your genes determining the rate of caffeine metabolism,” says Skolnik. For those who absorb caffeine quickly, it can maintain performance, but for those who use a slower metabolism, it can cause chills and anxiety, which can actually affect performance.

IT COULD CAUSE STOMACH UPSET

“For some, caffeine can stimulate the gastrointestinal tract, so for outdoor athletes such as runners and cyclists, this should be taken into account,” notes Goodson.

IT IS NOT ALWAYS A GOOD CHOICE FOR RACE DAY

“If you’re participating in any form of competition or running, it’s important to note that you’re pumping more adrenaline into your veins, which also speeds up your heart rate,” says Goodson. “Adding caffeine can make the situation worse and cause you discomfort.”This may not apply to everyone, but it’s worth considering taking supplements before training before a big race or sporting event.

IT COULD THEIR SLEEP, CONFUSION

“Caffeine can disrupt the normal sleep cycle,” emphasizes Stefansky. “This can cause a vicious cycle in which caffeine causes chronic drowsiness and fatigue, and reduces the quality and duration of sleep.”

SOME SUPPLEMENTS MAY NOT BE EFFECTIVE

“Some foods may contain nutritional supplements that have been confirmed by accurate studies, but not in a dose that actually improves performance,” says Stefansky. For example, although some pre-workout foods contain beta-alanine, a healthy dose for athletes is usually not included in the combination product.

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